Periodontics
Gum Disease

Bacteria: Our mouths are full of bacteria.

Plaque: Bacteria constantly form’s a sticky, colorless “plaque” on the teeth.

Tartar: Plaque that is not removed hardens to form bacteria-harboring "tartar."

Inflammation: Inflammation of the gums is called "gingivitis." If left untreated, it can advance to "periodontitis," which is an inflammation around the tooth that affects the bony support.

Gums Pull Away from Tooth: In Periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth and form "pockets" that are infected. Plaque and tartar spread and grow below the gum line and break down the bone and connective tissue.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is an early stage of gum disease. Gingivitis develops as toxins, enzymes and other plaque byproducts by irritating the gums, making them tender, swollen and likely to bleed easily. Gingivitis generally can be stopped with proper oral hygiene and minor treatment from your dentist. If this is achieved, your gums can return to a healthy state.

Periodontitis

When the bone tissue starts to deteriorate, this is known as a form of gum disease called Periodontitis. This happens when the byproducts of plaque attack the tissues that hold your teeth to the bone. The gums begin falling away from the teeth and form pockets in the gums which allows more plaque to collect below the gum line. When this occurs, the patient becomes more sensitive to hot and cold and the roots of the teeth are more vulnerable to decay.

Scaling and Planing

Tooth scaling removes plaque, tartar and hard crusty calculus deposits, which are loaded with bacteria. Sub-gingival tooth scaling is necessary when plaque and tartar are detected below the gum line. After scaling the tooth roots may need to be planed to smooth the root surface. Soft tissue will re-attach itself to a smooth tooth surface. Your dentist may also recommend medications to help control infection, pain, or to encourage healing.

Gum Flap Surgery

When deep pockets between teeth and gums (6 millimeters or deeper) are present, it is difficult for a dentist to thoroughly remove the plaque and tartar. Gum flap surgery is a procedure where the gum flap is lifted away from the tooth. Diseased tissue and sometimes bone is removed. The rough surfaces of the tooth are then smoothed by root planing. The area is medicated and the gum flap is replaced and sutured allowing the bone and gum tissue to heal. One of the goals of gum flap surgery is to reduce the depth of the periodontal pockets to make them easier to keep clean.

Periodontal Health Effects
Periodontal Health Effects

Research has shown that gum disease can influence heart disease and other health conditions in negative ways. They suggest that gum disease could even be a more serious factor in heart disease than smoking, cholesterol, hypertension or age. One reason for this is the fact that the bacteria found in diseased gums can come loose and move throughout the body. When this bacteria reaches arteries, it can cause arterial plaque to build up and harden which in return adversely affects blood flow.

Sensitivity

Teeth that are suffering damage from gum disease will always be more sensitive to cold; and if you avoid cleaning them due to this sensitivity, it can only make the problem worse.

After dental treatment, some teeth may be more sensitive because this is their way of dealing with injury. Injuries to teeth such as cavities, gum infection and jaw clenching can damage the nerves in a tooth. The sensitivity should not last long after treatment as long as your teeth are kept clean; otherwise, the sensitivity is likely to get worse. If your teeth are ever extra sensitive, please consult with Dr. Gilio as this could be a sign that you need a root canal or gum tissue treatment.

Soft Tissue Grafting
Soft Tissue Grafting

Root exposure resulting from gingival tissue recession may pose multiple problems for patients:
- Undesirable Aesthetics
- Root Sensitivity
- Impaired Oral Hygiene
- Increased Caries Susceptibility
- Teeth May Become Loose


A gingival tissue graft will restore the proper gum tissue structure around the tooth.

Bone Regeneration

Tooth loss occurs for many reasons, including: dental decay, root canal problems, fractures, periodontal disease, and trauma. Additionally, in some cases teeth never develop. As a result of tooth loss, the bone melts away. If there is inadequate bone to support surrounding teeth and future possible dental implant(s), bone grafting materials are used to rebuild and regenerate the bone. This process aims to provide sufficient bone quantity and quality for implant placements and supporting tooth structure.

Ridge Regeneration

When a tooth is lost and not immediately replaced, the bone reacts to this event by 'shrinking back'. The bone becomes thinner from a width perspective and the bone height is frequently reduced. This process is known as bone resorption. In order to place implants, it is necessary to rebuild the bone width and height through regenerative surgical therapy. Bone grafting of the ridge is almost always required to enable accurate placement of dental implants. The grafting is completed utilizing tissue bank and/or synthetic bone particles combined with collagen membranes. It is a highly predictable procedure.

Functional Crown Lengthening

Functional crown lengthening is a surgical procedure that re-contours the gum tissue and often the underlying bone of a tooth. Crown lengthening is often for a tooth to be fitted with a crown. It provides necessary space between the supporting bone and crown, which prevents the new crown from damaging bone and gum tissue.

Brushing

Step 1 - Place bristles along the gum line at a 45 degree angle. Gently brush using a circular motion along the outer and inner tooth surfaces.
Step 2 - Brush each tooth individually. Tilt brush vertically behind the front teeth. Using the front half of the brush, use the same circular motion.
Step 3 - Place the brush against the biting surface of the teeth and use a gentle back-and-forth motion. Brush the tongue to remove odor-producing bacteria.

How do I use Dental Floss?

Break off about 18 inches of floss and wind some of it around your middle finger (3 turns); this finger will take up the floss as it becomes dirty. Shorten the length between the two fingers to 6 inches and wind some floss (1 turn) around the opposite middle finger. Hold the floss tightly between your thumbs and index fingers. Guide the floss between your teeth using a gentle rubbing motion. When the floss reaches the gum line, curve it into a C-shape against one tooth. Gently slide it into the space between the gum and the tooth. Hold the floss tightly against the tooth as you gently rub the side of the tooth with an up and down motion. Before retrieving it, reverse the C-shape to clean the adjacent tooth surface as well.

As you finish cleaning each tooth, wind the dirty floss once around the first middle finger and slide more new length of floss to proceed to the next teeth

Get The Care You Deserve!

Laser Perio Solutions would love to meet you and provide you with the dental care you need and give you all the smiles you deserve! Our office provides the dental care you need to achieve the beautiful, natural look you seek. We provide laser and sedation dentistry and are able to suit your periodontal needs. Our office is easily accessible and makes it convenient to those living near Visalia to get the care they deserve.

Or call us today at:
(559) 625-4911